Everything That Happens In The Courtroom Is Your Fault

Everything that happens in the courtroom is your fault. Your witness got hit with something you never anticipated? That’s your fault. The other side made a devastating argument that you had no comeback for? That’s your fault. You slipped up on cross examination and opened the door to devastating evidence previously ruled inadmissible? That’s your fault. You failed to preserve an issue for appeal? That’s most definitely your fault.

Almost everything that happens in the courtroom can be anticipated, prevented, and corrected if you spend enough time preparing for trial. The more time you spend preparing your witnesses, the less time they will spend getting beat up on cross examination. The more you think about the evidence against you and how your opponent can use it the less you’ll find yourself during trial confronted with things you never thought about.  The more time you spend researching the law as it relates to every aspect of your case the less time you’ll spend at the bar lamenting not having preserved issues for appeal.

Everything that happens in the courtroom is your fault. The more time you spend preparing, the less time you’ll spend beating yourself up after the trial.

Someone once said that there are two kinds of pain in trial work, the pain of discipline and the pain of failure. I’d take the pain of discipline every single time.

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